Bridges and Highways

Susquehanna River Bridge Replacement
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Susquehanna River Bridge Replacement
Client: Pennsylvania Turnpike Authority
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
The Susquehanna River Bridge Replacement was construction of a new 1.1-mile bridge crossing the Susquehanna River. The innovative pre-cast segmental bridge has sleek, modern features including slender bridge piers with a vertical band of limestone cast into the bright white concrete.

Each of the 78 concrete bridge piers were cast-in-place across the river. Simultaneously, the box-like bridge cross sections were cast at an off-site pre-cast yard, trucked to the site and hoisted by crane and lowered onto a 150 foot long steel truss resting atop two piers.

When 14 segments were lined up on the truss, long steel cables were strung through the segments and post-tensioned. Then, the truss was launched ahead for the next span. This occurred 39 times for the new westbound bridge, and 39 times for the new eastbound bridge.

The new six-lane bridge will be built just 60 feet north of the existing structure.
Burlington Cable Stayed Bridge
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Burlington Cable Stayed Bridge
Client: Iowa Department Transportation
Iowa (across the Mississippi River )
Kraemer constructed the Burlington Cable Stayed Bridge, a single pylon bridge spanning 325 feet above normal river stage supporting 54 cables and the 660 foot long main span.

The steel superstructure was erected in segments and cables were attached to support the segment. The overall superstructure was constructed in a balanced cantilever manner until closure was reached on both the main span and back spans.

Pre-cast deck panels followed by a cast-in-place overlay completed construction of the superstructure.
Woodrow Wilson Bridge Precast Concrete Approaches
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Woodrow Wilson Bridge Precast Concrete Approaches
Client: Maryland & Virginia DOT
Maryland
Kraemer constructed the 3,300 foot long Maryland approach spans for the Woodrow Wilson Bridge across the Potomac River. Each of the complex V-piers were constructed using a strictly measured match-cast system with each pier increasing in size as they progress across the river. Each segment was cast individually and no two segments were cast alike.

Each of the 616 segments were formed and poured at an 11 acre precast yard just off the Maryland shore. Once formed and poured, segments were placed on an adjusting frame and aligned, precast blocks were placed, segments were partially post-tensioned and a cast-in-place closure joint was formed between the pedestals and segments.

The remaining segments were erected and post-tensioned in a cantilever fashion, piers were constructed and tie beams were placed between the top knuckle segments. Once segments were post-tensioned together, structural steel erection began. In total, more than 40 million pounds of steel were erected from the water.

Work on the southern span or Outer Loop was completed first, then traffic was switched from the existing bridge onto the new span, and the old structure was demolished as the Inner Loop was constructed.
Mark Twain Bridge (across the Mississippi River)
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Mark Twain Bridge (across the Mississippi River)
Client: Missouri DOT
Hannibal, Missouri
The Mark Twain Bridge is 4,491 feet long and 85 feet wide. The bridge rests on 27 piers and bents. Edward Kraemer & Sons constructed the substructure and both approach spans, and installed the concrete deck.

The Illinois approach consists of 21 total spans. There are six 220 foot long steel plate girder spans, one 218-foot-long steel plate girder span, one 151 foot long span and one 145 foot long span. In addition, there are twelve spans of 130 foot long continuous composite pre-stressed concrete girders.

The Missouri approach consists of two 85-foot-long spans of continuous composite pre-stressed concrete girders, one 170 foot long steel plate girder span and one 105-foot-long steel plate girder span.

Phase 1 of the project included: 8,167,900 pounds of fabricated structural steel, 3,193,530 pounds of reinforcing steel, 7,367,002 pounds of steel H-piling, 2,340 linear feet of drilled shafts, 12,085 cubic yards of seal concrete, 23,200 cubic yards of substructure concrete and 20,500 linear feet of pre-stressed concrete “bulb-T” girders.

In the third phase, materials included: 4,208,754 pounds of reinforcing steel and 12,433 cubic yards of concrete.
I-35 E Bridge (over the Mississippi River )
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I-35 E Bridge (over the Mississippi River )
Client: Minnesota DOT
St. Paul, Minnesota
The I-35E bridge spans 1,400 feet across the Mississippi River in St Paul, Minnesota. The entire bridge was replaced while maintaining 2 lanes of traffic in both directions at all times.

The Kraemer project team completed the majority of the scope of work on this challenging project constructing over the Mississippi River and under the existing structure. The new substructure was built directly under the old bridge, challenging the project team to drive sheeting and H-pile in a space confined by the existing bridge. Additionally, operators had no room for error when setting rebar cages for the columns or setting gang forms.

The superstructure was completed in phases allowing traffic to be switched from the old bridge to the new bridge; maintaining the required 2 lanes of traffic in each direction. The structure has 5 new piers and each column is designed to resemble a tulip.
Woodrow Wilson Bridge Bascule Spans
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Woodrow Wilson Bridge Bascule Spans
Client: Maryland & Virginia DOT
Washington D.C.
This project included the construction of three bascule spans, including the twin drawbridges, of the new 12-lane Mainline of I-95/I-495 across the Potomac River. The structure is nearly 120 feet tall, and each of the three, cast-in-place, post-tensioned, V-shaped arched ribs per pier are nearly 200 feet long.

The drawbridge added an additional 20 feet of clearance for marine traffic, which decreased interruption of road traffic by more than 70 percent. The design also allowed for a future light rail system.

More than 40,000 cubic yards of concrete was placed in the piers and 14 million pounds of structural steel was incorporated into the bascule leaves. Each arch rib was divided into three segments and constructed using a cast-in-place system.
Page Avenue Tied Arch Bridge
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Page Avenue Tied Arch Bridge
Client: Missouri DOT
St. Louis, MO
Construction of  twin 17-span bridges across the Missouri River as part of the Page Avenue Extension Project relieving congestion on I-70 in St. Louis, Missouri. Kraemer constructed two, 600 foot long tied arches for the main bridge spans. To expedite construction, each tied arch was floated into place above the Missouri River’s navigational channel on a falsework tower custom designed by Kraemer. Project scope also included construction of concrete decks and approaches.

The superstructure consists of ten spans of pre-stressed concrete girders, six spans of steel plate girders and tied arches. The completed bridge spans approximately 3,200 feet across the Missouri River.
Price Road Interchange
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Price Road Interchange
Client: Arizona DOT
Chandler, Arizona
Kraemer constructed a new four level traffic interchange located in Maricopa County where the Price Freeway (State Route 101) and the Santan Freeway (State Route 202) connect. Work included construction of a new multi-level directional urban traffic interchange including roadway excavation, grading, concrete pavement, asphaltic concrete pavement, construction of seven new concrete bridges, retaining walls, noise walls, concrete box culverts, drainage facilities and a storm water pump station.

Kraemer was responsible for construction of 7 cast in place, post tensioned box girder bridges ranging in length from 300 feet to 1,500 feet. Additional project highlights included 14,000 feet of retaining, noise and MSE walls, 3,500 feet of box culvert and 4,500 feet of channel paving. Kraemer coordinated and scheduled over 20 subcontractors, 10 material vendors and 10 utility companies on the project.
Navajo Bridge
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Navajo Bridge
Client: Arizona DOT
Marble Canyon, Arizona
Kraemer constructed the Navajo Bridge, a 726 foot steel arch with steel girder approach spans. The entire bridge spans 909 feet with a bridge deck over 500 feet above the Colorado River. In addition to the bridge construction, Kraemer re-aligned the approach roadways.

Unique construction elements included arch skewbacks excavated in the canyon walls, and a structural steel erection scheme featuring cantilevered construction and a traveler crane mounted on top of the cantilevered arch section.
I-25 Douglas County
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I-25 Douglas County
Client: Client: Colorado DOT
Lakewood, Colorado
This project consisted of a complete rebuilding of 2.5 miles of I-25 in Douglas County, Colorado in both the northbound and southbound directions. I-25 expanded from 2 to 3 lanes in each direction. Five permanent structures were also built as part of the project; four structures on I-25, and one structure for the Town of Castle Rock over the environmentally sensitive Plum Creek. The project also required the construction of a temporary bridge on I-25 to facilitate construction phasing.

As an innovative approach, Kraemer utilized gang forms for the abutments from available inventory of E-beams and Super Studs. Using detailed form design, the optimum number/size of forms were built for maximum reuse.

Kraemer re-phrased the project, consolidating nine phases of traffic switch re-alignments, down to five. The re-phasing resulted in greater efficiency in concrete paving resulting in eliminating 3 months off the paving schedule and project duration.

Two of the structures on I-25 were designed as structural steel bridges. The lead time for structural steel for the bridges was longer than desired. Subsequently, Kraemer proposed a Value Engineering (VE) change for these two structures from structural steel girders to pre-stressed concrete box girder beams. This VE expedited work at the interchange and allowed work underneath these two bridges to be completed earlier and provided the traveling public improved access to the new interchange.
Woodmen Road Corridor Improvements, Phase I
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Woodmen Road Corridor Improvements, Phase I
Client: City of Colorado Springs
Colorado Springs, Colorado
Woodmen Road Corridor Improvements is Phase 1 of the City of Colorado Springs/Pikes Peak Regional Transportation Authority’s portion of improvements being made within the Woodmen Road Corridor (I-25 to US 24). Phase I focused on providing three continuous lanes in each direction from I-25 to Stinson Road. The project converted an at-grade intersection of Academy Boulevard and Woodmen Road to a grade separated, single point urban interchange (SPUI) by lowering Academy approximately 12 feet and constructing Woodmen Bridge over Academy. Key elements of the project were to construct 66 inch storm water trunk line to Cottonwood Creek, re-route a 42 inch steel waterline that serves approximately one third of Colorado Springs under a tight 120 hour shutdown schedule, multiple utility relocations, roadway grading and pavement, detention ponds and a drainage system. The proposed interchange raises Woodmen Road above Academy Boulevard, allowing traffic to flow freely north and south along Academy. In addition to the intersection, this project added east-west bike lanes and sidewalks along Woodmen, included extensive utility relocations, storm drainage improvements, concrete retaining and sound walls, and several aesthetic enhancements.

Kraemer performed a pre-bid analysis of the proposed 8 step construction phasing sequence and offered alternatives to improve the construction schedule from 33 months to 25 months. Kraemer proposed several innovative approaches to maintaining travel lanes as required in the project specifications with multiple temporary alignments to accommodate traffic. Kraemer also proposed moving a large water quality vault from a location in a residential area to an area away from the residences. This dramatically reduced the impacts to the residential communities during installation of the structure. Kraemer also proposed and implemented modifications to resolve constructability issues regarding utility conflicts as well as permanent and temporary easement issues.
Speer Boulevard Bridge
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Speer Boulevard Bridge
Client: City and County of Denver
Denver, Colorado
Kraemer replaced two multi-span bridges over the Platte River and Water Street in Denver with twin, 3 span structures. Each bridge had two simple span approaches and a 260 foot long tied arch main span. In addition to the structure work, Kraemer reconstructed Water Street and completed various landscape and architectural features surrounding the project.

During the first phase of the project, Kraemer widened the existing southbound bridge to accommodate both north and southbound traffic. Additional caissons, columns, pier caps, and steel girders were added to widen the existing structure. Upon completion of this phase, the existing northbound structure was removed. Once the northbound structure was completed, Kraemer diverted traffic, removed the southbound structure and replaced it with a completely new structure.

The project placed approximately 3.3 million pounds of structural steel, 4,600 cubic yards of structural concrete, 2,300 linear feet of bridge rail and 10,000 tons of asphalt.


Seneca Bridge over the Illinois River
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Seneca Bridge over the Illinois River
Client: Illinois DOT
Seneca, Illinois
This project included the replacement of the existing IL 170 Bridge over the Illinois River with a new bridge on a new alignment, new roadway approaches and demolition of a 1930’s 4 span through truss bridge. The new 10 span structure is 1,703 feet long and consists of 2, 12 foot travel lanes with 3 foot shoulders. The bridge carries a 5 foot sidewalk separated from the southbound traffic lane by a concrete barrier. Piers on land are founded on 5,108 lineal feet of H-pile where 2 river piers were constructed with a cofferdam and 5, 5 foot diameter drilled shafts per pier. Construction also included both concrete and HMA pavement, earth embankment and grading, storm sewer and drainage structures, and bridge deck and roadway lighting.

I-270/I-170 Interchange Reconstruction
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I-270/I-170 Interchange Reconstruction
Client: Missouri DOT
St. Louis, Missouri
Kraemer was the prime contractor for this high priority project in North St. Louis County. This was the highest volume interchange MO-DOT has reconstructed to date, and all work was completed in a live traffic environment.

Kraemer demolished the 6 existing bridges and replaced them with 7 new bridges. To complete the bridge work, 65,000 lineal feet of steel H-Piling was driven, 13,000 cubic yards of concrete poured, 2.5 million pounds of reinforcing steel installed, 91 pre-stressed concrete girders and 3.9 million pounds of structural steel erected and 17,000 square yards of pre-stressed deck panels were set.

A total of 123 days were eliminated from the scheduled completion date due to early completion of two ramps.
Hoover Dam Bypass
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Hoover Dam Bypass
Client: Nevada DOT
Nevada Approach
The Hoover Dam Bypass, Nevada Approach includes construction of 2.2 miles of four-lane roadway leading from Nevada U.S. 93 to the Colorado Bridge crossing approximately 1,500 feet downstream from the Hoover Dam.

Six new bridges were constructed including: a wildlife underpass, interchange bridge, Nevada Canyon Bridge, lower portal access bridge and a reclamation warehouse bridge.

Construction of nearly 1.6 million cubic yards of earthwork, 50,000 square feet of retaining walls were erected, drainage improvements were made and the newly exposed rock cuts were stained.


Marquette Interchange
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Marquette Interchange
Client: Wisconsin DOT
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
The Marquette Interchange, Core and South Leg contracts required the demolition and reconstruction of the entire interchange. This involved 21 bridge structures which included over 300,000 lineal feet of piling and 100,000 cubic yards of concrete to construct 1,550,000 square feet of bridge deck. The 21 structures utilized a combination of pre-stress concrete girders, steel plate girders and structural steel tubs as the main structural members. The elevation of these bridges ranged anywhere from 20 feet at the lowest level to 130 feet for the upper most flyover structures. In addition to the bridges, there were 16 retaining wall structures consisting of conventional cast in place concrete, 9 ½ inch thick full height precast concrete panels, MSE wall panels and drilled shaft secant pile walls.

One of the important elements of this project revolved around the numerous levels of elevated structures. This was not only critical during the erection and construction phase but also during the demolition activities as well. A large portion of the exiting structures were cast in place box girder bridges which require careful planning and engineering to remove in a safe and controlled manor. Many of these structures were located in excess of 100 feet in the air over numerous levels of operating freeway.
Another major element of this project involved numerous stages and traffic switches with interim completion dates.

Aggressive project management and schedule re-sequencing early in the project resulted in numerous, critical activities originally slated for the second and third construction seasons to be completed during the first 18 months of the project. Completion of these critical activities coupled with the DOT's request to accelerate the schedule, resulted in a finish date 2 months ahead of the scheduled completion date.
Kilbourn Avenue Bascule Bridge Rehabilitation
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Kilbourn Avenue Bascule Bridge Rehabilitation
Client: Wisconsin DOT
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
The West Kilbourn Avenue Bridge over the Milwaukee River was constructed in 1929. Despite previous efforts to rehabilitate the bridge, by 2006 it was in desperate need of extensive repairs. Kraemer devised a jacking system to raise each bridge leaf out of the trunnion bearings with the use of hydraulic jacks. The eight (8) trunnion shafts were then machined in-place while the sixteen (16) trunnion bearings were sent off-site to be refurbished. The original machinery was removed, repairs were completed to the supporting concrete, and the span drive, span lock, and electrical system was replaced.

To preserve the historic features of the bridge, extensive rehabilitation of the bridge houses, limestone components, bridge railing, structural steel, and pedestrian walkway was required.

Despite a visual inspection of the bridge during the preparation of the contract drawings, it was found during the construction process many bridge components, including the floorbeams and stringers, were deteriorated more than originally anticipated. Almost all of the floorbeams and stringers were fully replaced instead of repairing them as originally required.

To add to the challenge of this project, at least one leaf of the bridge had to remain operational at all times and the Milwaukee River’s boat traffic could not be impeded. Once the bridge leaf was lowered back into the bearings, Kraemer performed intermittent balance calculations as steel was installed. The leaf was counterweighted so a hydraulic winch system could be used to open the leaf while still under construction.

In the total, 345,000 pounds of structural steel, 310 cubic yards of concrete, 6,200 square feet of deck grating, and 7,250 linear feet of ironwood decking was used to restore the structure.
I-43/94 North-South Freeway
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I-43/94 North-South Freeway
Client: Wisconsin DOT
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
The North-South Freeway project consisted of removing and replacing three overpass structures over Interstate I-43/94 just south of Milwaukee. The project also included concrete pavement, storm sewer, grading, and secant pile walls.

Maintaining traffic to the interstate and the airport ramps added complexity to the project as well as an extremely tight schedule. Multiple shifts were worked throughout the project due to access constraints into certain areas of the project.

I-35E/I-94
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I-35E/I-94
Client: Minnesota DOT
St. Paul, Minnesota
This four and-a-half year project consisted of one mile of interstate highway construction with multiple exit and entrance ramps, city street construction, seven bridges, retaining walls, and cut and cover tunnel. To minimize disruption to vehicle and pedestrian traffic, work was completed in several phases with frequent traffic changes.
US-6 Clear Creek Canyon Bridge Rehabilitation
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US-6 Clear Creek Canyon Bridge Rehabilitation
Client: Colorado DOT
Clear Creek Canyon, CO
This project was the fast track reconstruction of the superstructure, rehabilitation of the substructure and full depth deck replacement of three bridges located in Clear Creek Canyon on US-6 in just twelve (12) days.  US-6 is a heavily traveled major route between Denver and the gaming communities of Black Hawk & Central City (home to 45 casinos).  Clear Creek is utilized by recreational enthusiast for rafting, fishing, rock climbing, etc. and the environmentally sensitive mountain terrain is home of various wildlife such as big horn sheep.

Colorado Department of Transportation’s design to minimize impact to the traveling public and safely move traffic flow during construction consisted of several challenging conditions; structures were in poor condition and located near tunnels, high traffic volumes utilizing one lane 24/7 (mostly at night), and casino owners concerned that patrons may be deterred from the gaming tables due to alternate routes.  These challenges shifted the design focus from traditional construction and materials to fast track repair utilizing innovative Accelerated Bridge Construction (ABC) techniques which included installation of full depth and width pre-stressed, precast panels which were post tensioned for the length of each structure.

A unique component of the design of the project was that CDOT sought the input of Kraemer to review the concept of the fast track design.  Kraemer also provided CDOT with preliminary construction schedules and input on the methods and means of performing the construction as well as assisting in the review and implementation of ABC techniques and materials such as high strength, high early concrete mix design and high strength, high early grout design prior to construction of the project.

The result of this fast track project was the successful completion of the superstructure demolition and replacing three bridge decks totaling 18,577 SF with full depth precast panels, 1,200 LF of cast-in-place Type 7 bridge rails and the substructure pier column rehabilitation and concrete pier diaphragms in a period of only 12 days from the closure of Clear Creek Canyon to re-opening to the traveling public. The overall success of this project was accomplished by an integrated, collaborative team engaged in comprehensive, detailed planning and excellence in execution of the design and construction of the project.